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Consumer Multisensory Experience and Cosmetics

  • By Trulux Team
  • •  Feb 06, 2019

Cosmetics companies and manufacturers have done years of research on sensory experience and topical products like skin creams, hair products, roll-ons and spray-ons: how smooth and light a cream should feel; the rough texture of a body scrub; the way a hair conditioner makes a consumer's hair feel soft and not sticky. 

While the consumer thinks of each product they use in relation to results, the consumer experience is not unisensory.

Experimental psychologists at the University of Oxford have conducted experiments in consumer experiences and sensory integration.*

You may have already thought about the colour of the packaging and the scent of your cosmetic product, but the University of Oxford research suggests that consumer experience can be influenced by the sound when you open hte bottle, the weight of the packaging, and the feel and the texture of everything from the box to the tube to the cream itself.

Chanel International B.V. already leveraged this knowledge in 2010 with their Rouge Coco Lipsticks. Their lipstick cases were redesigned with a new metal material and shape to give a fresh sensation when users wrap their fingers around a Rouge Coco tube. The closure system of the Rouge Coco lipsticks went through several trials until engineers found the right feel and sound — from the soft press on the cap and the sound of the lipstick clicking shut. The revitalisation of Chanel's classic product garnered the interest of millennial consumers, who praised the lipstick for its new take on traditional luxury.

When it comes to creating sensory experiences with cosmetics, there is a lot to learn from Chanel. 

Think of a crisp compressible spray button on a facial mist to heighten the consumer's sense of refreshment, or a softer spray button to emphasise the gentle, nourishing nature of the ingredients. Consider using a mixture of rough and smooth on bottles for hair products so that the consumer's fingers are prompted to feel the same transformation in their hair. 

A good cosmetics manufacturer will be able to work with you and guide you through all the options to communicate your brand to your consumers.  


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